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Thread: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

  1. #61
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

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    Quote Originally Posted by rezdwan View Post
    Hello, guys.

    Here's an update that I was supposed to post yesterday.









    It's been three weeks since I set up my shrimp tank and everything is going well so far. I think it's safe to assume that the tank is fully cycled based on the following result I got.



    pH: 6.4
    Ammonia: 0
    Nitrite: 0
    Nitrate: 10

    The Third Experiment

    As I've mentioned before, I wanted to see how effective my setup is in keeping ammonia and nitrite at zero and nitrate at 10ppm or lower without any water changes.

    So, what I did after testing the water parameters is to do just a water top up of about 10%.

    Anyway, there seems to be a certain preference between water changes vs top up in the shrimp keeper community. Hence the curiosity and doing this experiment.

    Would love to hear your inputs regarding your preference of doing a water change vs top up for your shrimp tank. Why do you prefer your method and why?

    Thank you in advance.
    What is that plant in your tank? Where did you buy it and for how much? Your tank looks awesome btw. A sign that your shrimp is doing well (water parameters are fine) your shrimp will moult.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

  2. #62
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Lets assume water used are filtered water (0tds) to make explanation easier.

    Water change = removal of water content. This content includes minerals, bb, waste, dirt, nitrate and anything u can think of. If the tank contain 10ppm of nitrate, by removing 10% of water and refill with 10% of new water, ur current tank content of nitrate will be 9ppm.

    Top up = refill water level lost from evaporation. Assume ur current water content of nitrate is 10ppm, evaporated 10% of water, it will mean ur current water content of nitrate would be 11ppm. By topping off the loss, tank nitrate will be back to 10ppm


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  3. #63
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by Bracehero View Post
    What is that plant in your tank? Where did you buy it and for how much? Your tank looks awesome btw. A sign that your shrimp is doing well (water parameters are fine) your shrimp will moult.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
    Hello, Bracehero.

    Thank you for your compliments.

    The plants in my tank are mini fissidens tied to driftwood. Got it from none other than jamesneo when he posted the Dec 2016 batch of mini fissiden for sale. You can see how much they roughly cost from there.

    And yes, happy to report that the shrimps are molting because I do find their molted shells in the tank once every few days.

    Cheers!
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

  4. #64
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by genki89 View Post
    Lets assume water used are filtered water (0tds) to make explanation easier.

    Water change = removal of water content. This content includes minerals, bb, waste, dirt, nitrate and anything u can think of. If the tank contain 10ppm of nitrate, by removing 10% of water and refill with 10% of new water, ur current tank content of nitrate will be 9ppm.

    Top up = refill water level lost from evaporation. Assume ur current water content of nitrate is 10ppm, evaporated 10% of water, it will mean ur current water content of nitrate would be 11ppm. By topping off the loss, tank nitrate will be back to 10ppm


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Hello, genki89.

    Thank you for explaining the concept above in an easy to understand manner. Now I'm beginning to see the benefit of doing water changes as opposed to just water top up.

    Then again, if I were to have more plants or add floating plants (for example), would that be able to keep the nitrate level lower than doing a water change?

    Or, would a water change still be necessary to more than just lower the nitrate level in a freshwater tank? As in, it will still be a good idea because it will help to reduce other harmful substances?

    Would love to hear more about the merits of water change vs water top up.
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

  5. #65
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Why people do water change is because the tank, which is a closed looped system, do not have the ideal condition to produce ammonia produce = nitrate converted = plant intake of nitrate = 1.

    I have read up in an article, there are many hobbiest who managed to maintain their tank in that manner, managed to keep nitrate at 0ppm. However, the tank is heavily planted.

    That being said, in order to maintain 0 nitrate, the plants have to be fast growing plants with plenty of nutrients. So i guess the tds, gh and kh should be very high which is not very ideal for most shrimps.

    As such, they still do water change not because of high level of nitrate, but to reduce the excess nutrients not taken in by plants ie iron potassium. This is to reduce the tds and gh so that the funa in there will be able to thrive.

    But with 0 nitrate, water change is still a must but it can be delayed. Most hobbiest recommend weekly, so i guess with good filtration maybe delay another 2 weeks? With 0 nitrate maybe 1 month before the gh and tds went over the threshold for the funa in there.


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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by genki89 View Post
    Why people do water change is because the tank, which is a closed looped system, do not have the ideal condition to produce ammonia produce = nitrate converted = plant intake of nitrate = 1.

    I have read up in an article, there are many hobbiest who managed to maintain their tank in that manner, managed to keep nitrate at 0ppm. However, the tank is heavily planted.

    That being said, in order to maintain 0 nitrate, the plants have to be fast growing plants with plenty of nutrients. So i guess the tds, gh and kh should be very high which is not very ideal for most shrimps.

    As such, they still do water change not because of high level of nitrate, but to reduce the excess nutrients not taken in by plants ie iron potassium. This is to reduce the tds and gh so that the funa in there will be able to thrive.

    But with 0 nitrate, water change is still a must but it can be delayed. Most hobbiest recommend weekly, so i guess with good filtration maybe delay another 2 weeks? With 0 nitrate maybe 1 month before the gh and tds went over the threshold for the funa in there.


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    Thank you for elaborating on what I asked before, genki89.

    I understand it better now and yes, I do agree with you that water changes are necessary for a shrimp tank after reading your explanation.

    Like you, I've also read about hobbyist that never did any water changes for months on end but that probably work for other types of tanks.

    Maybe I'll alternate between water changes and top up depending on the water parameters for my tank.

    Cheers!
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by genki89 View Post
    Why people do water change is because the tank, which is a closed looped system, do not have the ideal condition to produce ammonia produce = nitrate converted = plant intake of nitrate = 1.

    I have read up in an article, there are many hobbiest who managed to maintain their tank in that manner, managed to keep nitrate at 0ppm. However, the tank is heavily planted.

    That being said, in order to maintain 0 nitrate, the plants have to be fast growing plants with plenty of nutrients. So i guess the tds, gh and kh should be very high which is not very ideal for most shrimps.

    As such, they still do water change not because of high level of nitrate, but to reduce the excess nutrients not taken in by plants ie iron potassium. This is to reduce the tds and gh so that the funa in there will be able to thrive.

    But with 0 nitrate, water change is still a must but it can be delayed. Most hobbiest recommend weekly, so i guess with good filtration maybe delay another 2 weeks? With 0 nitrate maybe 1 month before the gh and tds went over the threshold for the funa in there.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    To add on to the above excellent explanation, planted tank owners often add additional nitrate (as fertilizers) so they must conduct weekly water change to remove any excess nitrates to prevent its build up which may cause nutrient imbalance or affect lifestock.

    Every tank is different so you must custom and tailor your water change accordingly.
    Last edited by aza; 15th Jan 2017 at 18:20. Reason: Spelling

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    hey bro. jus want to share with you a quick update on the cycling process of my tank.

    I'm pretty envious how u manage to add shrimp in in such a short period.



    this was my water para before the 3rd water change =*(

    still have about 0.25 ppm of ammonia.. I do hope that things gets better later when I test the water parameters!
    *fingers crossed*

    cheers and have a good weekend.

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by imtai View Post
    hey bro. jus want to share with you a quick update on the cycling process of my tank.

    I'm pretty envious how u manage to add shrimp in in such a short period.



    this was my water para before the 3rd water change =*(

    still have about 0.25 ppm of ammonia.. I do hope that things gets better later when I test the water parameters!
    *fingers crossed*

    cheers and have a good weekend.

    Sent from my SM-N920I using Tapatalk
    Hello, imtai.

    Sorry to hear that cycling your tank is taking longer than expected.

    Although I'm a newbie myself, I'll try to answer your questions as best as I can base on what I know.

    Let's start with how you got your tank set up. What substrate, additives, conditioners and filter media did you use?

    For example, I am using the following.

    Substrate: GEX Shrimp Sand
    Additives: BorneoWild Enlive & BorneoWild Bee Ball
    Conditioners: Seachem Prime & Seachem Stability
    Filter Media: Seachem de*nitrate

    Hopefully, we can see what could have contributed to the long cycling time for your tank base on your setup.

    Looking forward to your reply.

    P.S. You might want to start your own thread so we can track your tank progress like what schwip and I did.
    Last edited by rezdwan; 16th Jan 2017 at 10:00.
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

  10. #70
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by aza View Post
    To add on to the above excellent explanation, planted tank owners often add additional nitrate (as fertilizers) so they must conduct weekly water change to remove any excess nitrates to prevent its build up which may cause nutrient imbalance or affect lifestock.

    Every tank is different so you must custom and tailor your water change accordingly.
    Thank you for the additional info, aza.

    Though I won't need any fertilisers for this tank, I'm sure this info will be useful to others and me in the future.

    Couldn't agree more regarding what you said about "every tank is different". What works for one person, might not for others.
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Well, it's been almost a month since I set up this shrimp tank.

    Here's an update for Week 4 of this nano shrimp tank project.









    Water parameters seem stable and here's what I've got for this week.



    pH: 6.4
    Ammonia: 0
    Nitrite: 0
    Nitrate: 10

    My guess would be that the combination of substrate, additives, conditioners, filter, filter media and the humble mini fissidens is able to keep nitrate around 10ppm for now.

    The Fourth Experiment

    Will it be possible to bring the nitrate level even lower by doing weekly water changes in combination with floating plants? This is what I would like to try for this week onwards.

    As you can see from the first and the fourth photo above, I've already added three small clumps of floating plants. They are Salvinia cucullata that I got from one LFS.

    Even if the floating plants help to bring the nitrate level below 10ppm, I think it will still be a good idea to do weekly water change for my tank based on the feedback I've got.

    If I understood it correctly, lower nitrate level is good for the fauna but too low is bad for the flora? Do correct me if I'm wrong in this aspect and would love to learn more.

    Thanks, guys!
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Hey, guys.

    I forgot to add this earlier.



    This fella died shortly after I took this photo last week. Found out it wasn't moving anymore when I wanted to move it to a temporary tank. I edited this photo quite a fair bit to highlight the milky white colouration to its flesh. I didn't know that it was sick even though I saw it having a milky white colouration to its flesh a few days before it died.

    The only thing I can think of is that it died of muscular necrosis after going through some shrimp disease database online & forums. None of it gave me a concrete cause and treatment for this condition other than shrimps infected will eventually die within a few days.

    If you have come across this issue with your shrimps or know what the cause and treatment is, please do share it with us.

    Thanks!
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

  13. #73
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    bro may I ask if you quarantine ur shrimps before adding them into your main tank?

    I jus added some fr to my tank..what I did was to drip acclimatise and then observe to ensure no visible fungal or parasite infection.. once done.. I jus scoop them all into my tank.

    was wondering if a quarantine period will assist in reducing such death and infections.

    what are your thoughts? =)

    Sent from my SM-N920I using Tapatalk

  14. #74
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by imtai View Post
    bro may I ask if you quarantine ur shrimps before adding them into your main tank?

    I jus added some fr to my tank..what I did was to drip acclimatise and then observe to ensure no visible fungal or parasite infection.. once done.. I jus scoop them all into my tank.

    was wondering if a quarantine period will assist in reducing such death and infections.

    what are your thoughts? =)

    Sent from my SM-N920I using Tapatalk
    Hello, imtai.

    My thoughts on quarantine for new livestock?

    Glad you asked because I'm currently on the fence on this one and I hope others will give their inputs too. I understand that this is debatable and would love to hear more of what others think about quarantine procedures, duration and best practices. At the moment, my take on this subject is, it's either you do a proper quarantine or you don't do it at all.

    If I were to set up a basic quarantine tank, it will need to meet the following conditions (whether temporary or permanent setup).

    1. no substrate for easier cleaning (bare bottom)
    2. simple inert hardscape for the livestock to hide in (even the shrimp caves or shelters can work)
    3. dispensable plants to keep the nitrogen cycle going (floating plants will do)
    4. filter (sponge filter or HOB) with mature media
    5. good lighting (because it will be easier to observe the livestock and spot any parasites and etc. which you can't with poor lighting)

    Which means, in the case of temporary setup, it will have to be ready in advance before the arrival of new livestock.

    Any issues that needs to be fixed, will be done outside the quarantine tank. For example, if I need to give the livestock a salt bath another small tank will be used for this purpose. After treatment, the livestock are transferred back to the quarantine tank for more observation until I'm satisfied that they are ready for the main tank.

    But, if I do not have the luxury of time and budget for a quarantine tank, I might as well put them into the main tank and hope for the best. I'm saying this because an improperly set up quarantine tank will give the livestock more stress and make them more sick than if I were to just add them to a properly set up and cycled main tank.

    Do you agree with me?
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by rezdwan View Post
    Hello, imtai.

    My thoughts on quarantine for new livestock?

    Glad you asked because I'm currently on the fence on this one and I hope others will give their inputs too. I understand that this is debatable and would love to hear more of what others think about quarantine procedures, duration and best practices. At the moment, my take on this subject is, it's either you do a proper quarantine or you don't do it at all.

    If I were to set up a basic quarantine tank, it will need to meet the following conditions (whether temporary or permanent setup).

    1. no substrate for easier cleaning (bare bottom)
    2. simple inert hardscape for the livestock to hide in (even the shrimp caves or shelters can work)
    3. dispensable plants to keep the nitrogen cycle going (floating plants will do)
    4. filter (sponge filter or HOB) with mature media
    5. good lighting (because it will be easier to observe the livestock and spot any parasites and etc. which you can't with poor lighting)

    Which means, in the case of temporary setup, it will have to be ready in advance before the arrival of new livestock.

    Any issues that needs to be fixed, will be done outside the quarantine tank. For example, if I need to give the livestock a salt bath another small tank will be used for this purpose. After treatment, the livestock are transferred back to the quarantine tank for more observation until I'm satisfied that they are ready for the main tank.

    But, if I do not have the luxury of time and budget for a quarantine tank, I might as well put them into the main tank and hope for the best. I'm saying this because an improperly set up quarantine tank will give the livestock more stress and make them more sick than if I were to just add them to a properly set up and cycled main tank.

    Do you agree with me?
    very logical explanation wan! I think it definitely is true that if I can't provide a suitable environment to quarantine the shrimps, than I think I'm better off adding them to the tank directly after acclimatising.

    as a beginner I dun have that much resources to spare to set up another tank yet for quarantine.

    then again, if I have the proper resources and means to get the shrimps properly quarantine, I would. i would also be more cautious when adding more shrimps in once this batch of shrimps stabilise and thrive in the tank.

    same thing goes for plants or moss, I heard too much about snails and stuff hitchhiking on those aquatic plants. so quarantine would be the best bet to save ur tank from those outbreak =)

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Oh yes, I haven't update you guys on my fourth experiment.

    I added three small clumps of floating plants to see if it can bring down the nitrate level. Last I checked, nitrate is still hovering around 10ppm (after a week has passed).

    It seems like the floating plants have not made much impact in lowering the nitrate level. To be fair, they are still small but I'm happy to see that they have "multiplied" real quick.

    Hopefully, with a bigger volume of floating plants, it will help lower the nitrate level. Will continue to monitor and update here.
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Hello, everyone.

    It's been some time since I updated this thread and as mentioned earlier, I promised to update it monthly after the first month. So here goes the update for Week 8.

    What I Observed



    The three small clumps of floating plants that I added had grown to cover about 1/3 of my tank surface already. In spite of that, it didn't lower the nitrate level.



    I've been testing the water parameters weekly for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate all this while. No noticeable difference and everything has remained stable ever since.



    Nonetheless, I lost another four shrimps over these four weeks since the last update. They all exhibit the milky white flesh over a few days or weeks before dying.

    If you've read my previous post on this thread, some of my shrimps were found to be infected with the Scutariella japonica parasites. I was able to get rid of them by giving the shrimps a salt bath.

    I thought I had totally eradicated it but it somehow managed to make a comeback. The salt bath removed the parasites but I suspect that they had already laid eggs in the gills of some shrimps.

    This time, I didn't bother to take out my shrimps out of the tanks and instead opted to dose my whole tank with Seachem ParaGuard. I added half dose daily and the parasites are gone within a week.

    As a precaution, I continued adding half dose daily for another week. I hope this will kill any remnants of it. Especially the eggs which might still be on the shrimps.

    Since Seachem ParaGuard worked in my case, I will use the same method to get rid of Scutariella japonica in the future. It didn't cause any adverse effect on my plants or biological filter.

    I think salt baths can be harsh if too much salt is used or ineffective against the parasite eggs. Then again, these are my theories only and more on that later.

    I also noticed that there are very little to no more green hairy algae on my tank wall these past few weeks. They usually appear in less than a week. Maybe, I can safely assume that my tank is stable now?

    Changes I've Made



    Other than adding the floating plants, I have made changes to the catappa leaf and filter inlet sponge. The catappa leaf was disintegrating to a point that it has become an eyesore. I swapped it for a smaller one.



    As for the filter inlet sponge, I took a leap of faith and got a 13mm stainless steel mesh guard without knowing what size to get. Turns out, it fits nicely over the filter inlet tube.

    The photoperiod for my tank has also been bumped up from six hours to eight hours since the last two weeks. I will monitor closely if this cause more or fewer algae. So far, it's looking good.

    What I Plan To Do

    Currently, I'm left with only three shrimps in the tank. They do look healthy and although they are surviving, they are not thriving. That isn't the plan I had for this tank.

    I'm not looking to be a top breeder or anything but I do wish for the shrimps to breed. I'm planning to get about 20 Red Rili shrimps and try again. This project has taught me a lot so far.

    What I Would've Done Differently

    I could have pointed my fingers at the parasites for the mysterious deaths that my shrimps suffered from. But, when I think about it, I may have rushed things a little.

    Over these few weeks, I read up a lot on other aquarium-related articles and realised one thing. A cycled tank is one thing but a stable tank is another matter.

    If you ask me now, I would probably not add any fauna to a tank after it has been cycled but rather, I'd wait for it to be stable. What is considered a stable tank? Well, that's subjective. Let's discuss!
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

  18. #78
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Quote Originally Posted by rezdwan View Post
    What I Plan To Do

    Currently, I'm left with only three shrimps in the tank. They do look healthy and although they are surviving, they are not thriving. That isn't the plan I had for this tank.

    I'm not looking to be a top breeder or anything but I do wish for the shrimps to breed. I'm planning to get about 20 Red Rili shrimps and try again. This project has taught me a lot so far.
    Hi, everyone.

    Didn't plan to update this thread so soon but a major update is underway.

    On the same day that I submitted the last post, I caught wind of the following.



    I also knew that Green Chapter is currently running a promotion as follow.



    Needless to say, I went down the very next day and made a purchase.

    Will update with photos next week.

    Until then, happy shrimping!
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Hello, everyone.

    As promised last week, here's an update which I didn't plan for.

    What Actually Happened

    As mentioned earlier, an LFS just got a new shipment of shrimps and it got me excited especially because they were running a 10% discount promotion at the same time. I had planned to get a new batch of shrimps for my tank and this news came at an appropriate time.

    Before I went down to the LFS, I transferred the three remaining shrimps from the current batch to my daughter's tank (because it was in need of more algae crew anyway) and did my weekly tank maintenance (which includes a water change).

    After that, I proceeded to the LFS with a plan to get 15 female and five male shrimps giving it a 3:1 ratio which was recommended by those who has successfully bred shrimps.

    Buying The Shrimps

    There were a few other customers picking shrimps out of the tanks already but none were interested in my favorite Red Rili shrimps. The advantage of coming as soon as new shipment arrives is that you get to pick some of the better quality shrimps that you want.

    I noticed that there were a lot of berried shrimps and so I picked out 15 of them after carefully inspecting them one by one.

    The next step was to pick out another five male shrimps making the total number 20. I may have misidentified one of them and probably got 16 female shrimps and four male shrimps in the end. That gives it a ratio of 4:1 now but I guess it's okay.

    I tried my best to pick those that are actively grazing, has nice coloration and does not show any signs of fungal infection and/or parasites.

    Got the shrimps packed, paid for it, brought it back and acclimatised them to their new home.

    How They Are Doing Now

    If there's one thing I noticed about this batch of shrimps is that they were not swimming in a state of panic (like the first batch) when I added them to my tank after the acclimation. It could be that I have done the acclimation properly this time. 100% survival rate.

    It didn't take long for me to spot shrimplets in the tank. I think it was about one or two days after they arrived when I spotted the first shrimplet. As days went by, I began to see more and more shrimplets and they can be quite fun to watch. Very tiny and hard to spot, though.



    An overview of the new tank inhabitants.



    Gathering at the mini fissidens.



    Feeding time.



    Another overview from the side.



    Almost time to hatch. You can see the eyes on these eggs.



    Mummy shrimp ready to jump.



    Baby shrimp and mummy shrimp for comparison.



    One of the male shrimp, I think.

    The Two Dilemmas

    I didn't think about this beforehand when I picked the 15 berried female shrimps and now I'm left with two dilemmas.

    1. Do I save the eggs if any of the berried shrimps dies or dropped them for some reason?
    2. Are baby shrimp food necessary at this point?

    If you have any experience with what I've asked above or have any thoughts to share, I would love to hear it.

    Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by rezdwan; 27th Feb 2017 at 14:24.
    My name is Rezdwan Hamid but you can call me Wan.

    My Current Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Blacksand"

    My Previous Project: 12L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

  20. #80
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    Re: 13L Nano Shrimp Tank "Greenwood"

    Hi Wan,

    you can use a egg tumbled to hatch the egg in the event of your mama shrimp died. You have to take out the eggs and ensure that there is no flesh of the dead shrimp lingering on the eggs if not fungus will grow on the eggs and spoil it.

    For baby shrimps, you don't have to worry much because they will feed on the micro orgainism. It's better to have algae by the side of the tank so the shrimplets can feed on them.

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