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Thread: Know your chemistry

  1. #1
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    Know your chemistry

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    Hi guys,

    A lot of times, the abbreviation of chemicals just sounds greek to me. So here's a compiled list that might be helpful those starting out.

    B - Boron
    H3BO3 - Boric acid

    C - Carbon
    CO2 - Carbon Dioxide
    CO3(2-) - Carbonate ion
    HCO3- - Bicarbonate ion

    Ca - Calcium
    Ca2+ - Calcium ion
    CaCl2 - Calcium chloride
    CaCO3 - Calcium Carbonate
    CaMg(CO3)2 - Calcium Magnesium Carbonate (Dolomite)

    Cl - Chlorine
    Cl2 - Chlorine gas
    Cl- - Chloride ion

    Cu - Copper

    Fe - Iron
    Fe2+ - Ferric iron
    Fe3+ - Ferrous iron
    FeEDTA, FeEDDHA, FeDPTA - Chelated iron

    H - Hydrogen
    H+ - Hydrogen ion
    H3O+ - Hydronium ion
    H2O2 - Hydrogen Peroxide
    HCl - Hydrochloric Acid (Muriatic Acid)

    K - Potassium
    K+ - Potassium ion
    K2SO4 - Potassium Sulfate
    KCl - Potassium Chloride (Muriate of Potash)

    Mg - Magnesium
    Mg2+ - Magnesium ion
    MgSO4 - Magnesium Sulfate
    MgSO4.7H2O - Magnesium Sulfate Heptahydrate (Epsom Salt)

    Mn - Manganese

    Na - Sodium
    NaCl - Sodium Chloride
    NaHCO3 - Sodium Bicarbonate (Baking Soda)

    N - Nitrogen
    KNO3 - Potassium Nitrate
    NH3 - Ammonia
    NH4 - Ammonium
    NO2 - Nitrite
    NO3 - Nitrate

    O - Oxygen
    O2 - Oxygen gas
    O3 - Ozone

    P - Phosphorus
    PO4 - Phosphate
    KHPO4 - Potassium Dibasic Phosphate
    KH2PO4 - Potassium Monobasic Phosphate

    S - Sulfur

    Zn - Zinc

    Hope it's of some help.

    Cheers,
    Last edited by benny; 2nd Jan 2006 at 00:04.
    I have dwarf cichlids in my tanks! Do you?

  2. #2
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    Do note that ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and phosphaste are in ionic forms. For nitrates, nitrites and phosphastes, they are normally available attached to potassium or sodium.

    Oh, btw, the carbonate ion is 2-.
    Read me! :bigsmile: http://justikanz.blogspot.com/

    I'm crypt collecting... Starting cheap, now have Cryptocoryne beckettii, C.beckettii var petchii, C.crispatula var.balansae, C.griffithii(Melted! ), C.nurii, C.parva, C.pygmaea(Melted! ), C.tonkinensis(Melted! ), C.walkeri, C.wendtii 'Brown', C.wendtii 'Green', C.wendtii 'Green Gecko', C.wendtii 'Tropica' and Cryptocoryne x willisii

    Oh, juggling is hard work, man!...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justikanz
    Oh, btw, the carbonate ion is 2-.
    Thanks Thomas! I've updated it.

    Cheers,
    I have dwarf cichlids in my tanks! Do you?

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    Why do we always so iron in terms of FeEDTA?
    Any idea wat is the differences?

    Dunno if anyone can answer the question.
    ~ Vincent ~ Fishes calm your mind...
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/valice/





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    Just KPO a bit ah...

    Saw some people write chemical symbols all in small (lower) case. That is not right and if certain symbols are place together, might cause confusion. Same with all in caps (upper case).

    Therefore, just to suggest that symbols should be as they are above, i.e. those that are supposed to be in caps, be in caps and those that are supposed to be in lower case be in lower case...

    Just like scientific names should be on italics...

    Just trying to be, err... KPO?
    Read me! :bigsmile: http://justikanz.blogspot.com/

    I'm crypt collecting... Starting cheap, now have Cryptocoryne beckettii, C.beckettii var petchii, C.crispatula var.balansae, C.griffithii(Melted! ), C.nurii, C.parva, C.pygmaea(Melted! ), C.tonkinensis(Melted! ), C.walkeri, C.wendtii 'Brown', C.wendtii 'Green', C.wendtii 'Green Gecko', C.wendtii 'Tropica' and Cryptocoryne x willisii

    Oh, juggling is hard work, man!...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justikanz
    Do note that ammonium, nitrate, nitrite and phosphaste are in ionic forms. For nitrates, nitrites and phosphastes, they are normally available attached to potassium or sodium.

    Oh, btw, the carbonate ion is 2-.
    Spoken like a true alchemist, thomas
    Something about the water & the fishes that calms me down.

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    thomas is an alchemist? hey, make me some Au. pleaaase
    why I don't do garden hybrids and aquarium strains: natural species is a history of Nature, while hybrids are just the whims of Man.
    hexazona crumenatum Galleria Botanica

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    Sorry to disappoint... Me only a Materials Engineer... If can make Au, I won't be worried about the costs of the T5 HOs I want to buy...
    Read me! :bigsmile: http://justikanz.blogspot.com/

    I'm crypt collecting... Starting cheap, now have Cryptocoryne beckettii, C.beckettii var petchii, C.crispatula var.balansae, C.griffithii(Melted! ), C.nurii, C.parva, C.pygmaea(Melted! ), C.tonkinensis(Melted! ), C.walkeri, C.wendtii 'Brown', C.wendtii 'Green', C.wendtii 'Green Gecko', C.wendtii 'Tropica' and Cryptocoryne x willisii

    Oh, juggling is hard work, man!...

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    very ot here heehee but, heck, what kind of alchemist are you if you can't even make some lousy Au huh?
    why I don't do garden hybrids and aquarium strains: natural species is a history of Nature, while hybrids are just the whims of Man.
    hexazona crumenatum Galleria Botanica

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    Good post Benny!

    a refresher certainly...hope the list doesn't get much longer
    You can if you dare to fail - Stan Chung

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    well EDTA is a complex. FeEDTA carries a lot more Fe and it is released more soluble than throwing in a piece of iron(DUH)...if i am wrong please correct me

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    can ask if throwing in a tablet of normal iron (those eaten by humans), will be soluble enough for use in plants in tank?
    and if so, which form is better, the ferrous or the ferric?
    thnks for help.

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    Re: Know your chemistry

    Quote Originally Posted by valice View Post
    Why do we always so iron in terms of FeEDTA?
    Any idea wat is the differences?
    EDTA is a compound that forms strong bonds to metal ions. Free metal ions in our aquariums are rather reactive and might precipitate out of the water causing them to be unavailable to plants. however when iron is complexed with EDTA, it is water soluble and does not react with other molecules since EDTA binds very strongly to iron. so basically EDTA helps keep iron ions soluble in water.

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    Re: Know your chemistry

    The problem with EDTA is that in order to release the iron it has to exchange it. In soft water this normally comes at the expense of calcium or iron which causes the plants to manifest structural abnormalities (kind of like a slug had eaten the leaves) due to calcium shortages or chlorosis on account of a lack of magnesium. The normal diagnosis for chlorosis is a shortage of iron so in goes more Fe-EDTA...

    To dose with iron, rather press some small iron nails into the substrate around the plant roots. It works wonders with Crypts.

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