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Thread: Warm White or Cool Daylight?

  1. #1
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    Warm White or Cool Daylight?

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    Hi Folks,

    Which is better? Warm white is orangy, does it mean more red on its spectrum?

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    Yes maybe more red... or less blue...

    It is generally recommended to use ~6500K tubes AKA "daylight".

    But Dennerle Trocal Plant 3085 is very orangy. More like 3000K range.

    IMO, just try out. The difference may not be great. Or you can use what most of us normally use... 6500K daylight tubes.

    BC

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    ----------------
    On 12/11/2002 5:35:39 PM

    Which is better? Warm white is orangy, does it mean more red on its spectrum?
    ----------------
    Sort of.... what it probably means is that there is more red in the spectrum than blue and green... but it doesn't tell you much about how much red... so a warm white could have say 1000 lumens of red and 500 each of blue and green, while the cool white may have 1000 red, 750 blue and 750 green... So they have the same red, but different color temp.
    Allen

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    I have been using cool daylight at 6500K. Plants responding well but I have noticed lately the growing apex of my E. stellata and H polysperma 'Sunset' turning golden brown, "chow tah", on the topside of their leaves although the underside of the Stellata retains a more lilac colouration. I thought perhaps those cool daylight maybe on the high in the UV end. Could that be possible? Or is that how E stellata and H polysperma should look like?

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    Hmmm... chow tah? Got pics? The top leaves of my H. polyspermas do attain a goldish/brownish green sheen. Looks normal to me.
    Vincent - AQ is for everyone, but not for 'u' and 'mi'.
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    Vinz,

    Unfortunately no photo from the top yet. Haven't figure out how to shoot without getting bright reflection from the water surface. Am poor in photography

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    get a polarising filter
    that'll help to cut down most of the reflections

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    Sad to say, all I got is a simple point and shoot. Had to borrow a digi when I did some shots for posting.

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    try shoot at an angle to the glass. should minimise the reflection if not totally eliminated.
    thomas liew

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