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Thread: Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!

  1. #161
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    Re: Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!

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    Thanks alot for the repu

  2. #162
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    Santa Monica, CA, USA
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    Re: Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!

    Coming this summer 2016:
    Waterfall algae scrubber
    Version 2

    After I invented the waterfall scrubber in 2008, it's great that so many people got to DIY it, and it's also great that lots of builders/sellers used it as their design up until the current day. It's had over 7 years to gather hobbyists.

    2012 was a good year though, when I introduced the upflow scrubber. It's only had 3 years to gather hobbyists, but offers them what they did not have before: a compact place where they can put a scrubber that does not spill over when it fills up.

    Now that the upflows are established, it's time to do some more work on the waterfalls. They've been unchanged since 2008, and almost every part of them can be improved. So over the next year or two I'll post up the improvements piece by piece. Hopefully the improvements will be useful to all.

  3. #163
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    Re: Mega Powerful Nitrate and Phosphate Remover - DIY!

    Food input to reefs:

    "The form, solid or liquid, in which nutrients are added to marine ecosystems is of critical importance in determining the likelihood that the system will be able to assimilate them and incorporate them into the “web of life.” Too much liquid causes an imbalance and sickens the system, and mechanisms will be used by nature in those cases to get rid of the excess, unusable nutrients. The capacity of these systems to make use of solid food input far exceeds their capacity to assimilate liquid food."

    "Despite all the uncertainties about the relative contributions to the coral-reef ecosystems of different kinds of autotroph, bacteria, dissolved organic matter, and internal vs. external inputs, it is clear that the phenomenally high total productivity is in large measure due to the combination of a tremendous surface area of photosynthetic tissue (either in the form of zooxanthellae or benthic algae and higher plants), optimal light and temperature conditions for photosynthesis, and the tight recycling of nutrients in an otherwise nutrient-poor environment."

    http://www.fisherycrisis.com/coral3.html
    http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-03/eb/

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