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Thread: Hamburger Matten Filter & Styrene tank covers

  1. #1
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    Hamburger Matten Filter & Styrene tank covers

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    Hi people,

    any of you using or has tried using this filtration method?

    The link : Hamburger MattenFilter

    Similar to the sponge filter except the surface area is bigger and no need to wash the filter foam.

    What's your comment?
    Zulkifli

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    Ah! Why I never thought of that! Not a bad idea.

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    If you'd read through the translated article, the originator is using it for his killi tanks. Some calculations are also given if you want to do your own calculation. This method can be used using powerheads and also air-pump.
    Zulkifli

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    That`s a very interesting idea.So the most important factor in this case is the flow rate?I will try it out in my office`s tank Thanks for the link.
    ..............................
    When my fishes are happy, I'm happy.

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    I was wondering if any of you guys have built this type of filter and if you
    have pics showing construction. The location depicted requires joining
    ALL WET THUMB forum to see. Looks like an ideal planted tank filter that
    would blend in with few hardware warts showing This should be moved
    to either the planted tank or non-killie forum

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    This is hardly a new method but rather a modification of an old one. Where previously the sponges would of be shoved into trickle filter compartment or side filters made of glass here the side filter is glass. I had a friend who used to purchase 30 x 30 cm pieces of foam to shove into his 30 wide x 35 cm high tanks and then pump water from one side of the sponge into the rest of the tank using an air driven sponger filter uplift tube. Another friend took it one step further and made his own high power air driven uplifts. These things could suck up large bits of gravel!

    Essentially he would take a lenght of electrical conduit (the white tubing), heat 1 end till soft and then slip it over another piece so the 2 fitted inside each other. This he would leave to harden. The bottom piece (that the 1st piece was slipped over) was then modified by having a circular ring/depression edged into it from which vertical depressions were then made running up. In the top piece a whole was bored in which a piece pf rigid air line could be inserted. This was positioned such that it was directly opposite the circular depression in the bottom half. Air is then pumped into this depression which then exits via the verticle depressions. In the join the diffuses to form a curtain of air running up the tube. This creates a fast current (less turbulance than with bubbles moving up) that sucks up large volumes of water. It was calculated that it could move as much as 300 L per hour using an aquarium air compressor or even a Halipai (watched it fill a 250 ml cup in about 3 seconds at a 10 cm height above the fishtank's water level)...

    Here is a picture of what I'm tyring to explain above:


    regards

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    Quote Originally Posted by TyroneGenade
    Another friend took it one step further and made his own high power air driven uplifts. These things could suck up large bits of gravel!

    Essentially he would take a lenght of electrical conduit (the white tubing), heat 1 end till soft and then slip it over another piece so the 2 fitted inside each other. This he would leave to harden. The bottom piece (that the 1st piece was slipped over) was then modified by having a circular ring/depression edged into it from which vertical depressions were then made running up. In the top piece a whole was bored in which a piece pf rigid air line could be inserted....
    Tyrone,
    I still cannot figure how this design of airlift is constructed. Please elaborate further as I may want to incorporate it into my MattenFilter tanks.

    Folks,
    The 'Hamburger MattenFilter/Henri deBruyn' combo tank is completed (those roundtuits arrived! )

    Images should be self-explanatory. (Clickable as always)






    Two such tanks were set up. One house a reversed trio of Chromaphyosemion splendopleure C 89/15 Muyuka Police Station and the other, 2 pairs of Aphyosemion hera (recent post by Jian Yang).

    I used small 5w powerheads instead of airlift as the noise level from the airpump was not acceptable (it isn't real noisy pe se but a muffle over it would be nice).

    Time to rig yours up, Bill

    SIDE NOTE:
    Zul, now that we have a Non-Killie sub-forum, I'm moving this. This thread is more fish-relevant than plants
    I'm back & keeping 'em fingers wet,
    Ronnie Lee

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    Fantastic idea! Simple to build, effective and easy to maintain.
    I will do one ...

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    Time to rig yours up, Bill
    Ron, that looks like a powerful combination! Are you laying in substrate
    or bare bottom? What bogged me down on the hamburger is finding the
    right foam that was dark-colored and the right porosity. What size tank
    is this? Looks like a 10g....

    Bill

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    Do you guys know if those dark colour foam used for packing computer accessories can be used for this purpose ?
    If you are into Nature, check out the new NSS Nature Forum.
    See my Nature photos and Butterfly Blog

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    Bill,
    The tanks in question measures 24"L x 12"W x 14"H and volume is 66 Litres or 17.5 Gallon when filled to the brim. (What are the dimensions for a 'standard US 10g' tank?)

    A combo of 2 hypothetically proven filtration system is indeed awesome but I figured that for a low-maintenance species tank, that might be my ticket.

    Regarding porosity, it was mentioned in the provided links, that both fine and coarse pore density foam will work but the time taken for nitrifying bacterial colonies to establish will vary (IIRC, somewhat longer for coarse media). Still, I have good vibes and if nothing fouls up, I'll rig up another 4 more similar setups.

    For myself, I opted to paint the bottom and back panel of the tank in black. When matched with a black foam, it literally became a "no-can-see-MattenFilter"... quite literally (and I'm quite pleased with the effect).

    SIDE NOTE:
    Due to a series of circumstances, I'm forced to cut back on my tank count. Minimal maintenance has become a priority and I might reluctantly take a hiatus from the hobby.

    In the event that I'm unable to update the progress personally, I'll try to have Jian Yang or another volunteer to fill in the details.

    If the worst case senario becomes a reality, I'll attend to all outstanding issues prior to my (hopefully) temporary departure from the forum.
    I'm back & keeping 'em fingers wet,
    Ronnie Lee

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    Ron,
    A standard 10: 20" x 10" x12"high. The 17.5gal in your pics looks in scale
    to that, which threw me off Hopin' things turn out that you don't
    have to take an hiatus, but if so, a speedy and safe return!

    Bill

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    Bill,
    In terms of ratio (or scale), yes, the tank dimensions are deceiving but to date, the result from the combo is encouraging. Water is still crystal clear even though the next water change is due soon.

    I had hoped that the hiatus would be brief but at the rate that prevailing circumstances are going, that would be unlikely. Still, I hope to see your continued support to the forum and my best wishes in your future endeavours.
    I'm back & keeping 'em fingers wet,
    Ronnie Lee

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    Folks,
    The topic of acrylic tank covers was discussed briefly in the striatum thread but since it was going off-topic, I'd continue the 'cover story' here.

    Styrene sheets do come in differring thickness and in the event that thinner ones are used (because they're also easier to cut and finish), the resultant covers can and will sag if there's insufficient support.


    This 'half-cover' is supported only at the ends. Sag is obvious.


    A rib of stiff material prevents the sag but by itself, is not strong enough to support lighting. I'm not sure what the red plastic thing is but I found it in the dumps and recycled it. The Henri filter is behind the cover, forming the 'other half'. At the bottom right corner of the pic, I made a small loop from cable-tie to serve as a handle.


    Reinforcement with ribbing is fairly simple with cable ties. Note feeding holes on the right.

    For anything longer than 2 feet, I'd suggest using either PVC pipes or aluminum right-angled profiles. These should be strong enough to support a small light.

    For maintenance and ease of feeding, one can consider using two halves to cover the entire tank. The rear half will have provision/holes for filter hose, wire and air-tubings. This is one half that we'd seldom bother with.

    The other half at the front allows us to shuffle things around, feed, access for siphoning etc. Feeding holes, that a turkey baster tip can fit in, is convenient too. Just make sure that the holes aren't too big (diameter of an air-tubing is just right).

    Those who have permanent partitions in their tank might not need the ribs but it is easier to divide the 'front covers' into 2 or 3 pieces (depending on how wide apart the partitions are fixed). That way, one doesn't have to lift a long stretch of styrene or worry about the other killies jumping off while you're working at the other end of the tank.

    Not a sales pitch
    Due to my tank cut-back, it now seems that I've over-ordered on the styrene panels. These measure 2ft x 4ft and I think I've 4 extras at $10 per panel. Interested parties contact me via email.
    I'm back & keeping 'em fingers wet,
    Ronnie Lee

  16. #16
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    Dear all,
    Owing to other priorities, I'm slowly converting my low maintenance to adopt dual-filtration design, so that water quality does not deteriorate too quickly.

    Here's the 2nd 'Hamburger MattenFilter/Henri deBruyn' combo.

    This 24"L x 12"W x 12"H tank was partitioned with a 2cm gap at the base to allow a UGF plate to slip through, effectively an under-flow circulation from left to right partition. The plate will also help minimize substrate compacting and clogging. Corner MattenFilter was completed as per earlier links provided by Zul.


    Top view with styrene partition covers and OHF (OverHead Filter) half-filled with packing peanuts. (It adds volume without thinning my wallet The Henri filter is mainly for cooling, not bio-filtration. Besides, the huge foam filter will have adequate surface area for bacterial colonies)


    Remaining top-half is filled with Eheim's 'Ehfi Lav'. Capillary action within the filter wool, will help distribute water throughout the length of the OHF.


    'L-shaped' plastic profiles help support the styrene covers along the glass partition. The gravel was layered midway... then realized I didn't have enough


    Within the MattenFilter, I used another sponge to support the powerhead off the tank's bottom, which in time, will be filled with mulm (which will house more nitrifying bacteria). A low consumption 5W Eden 304 will deliver a rated 220~240 Litre/hr to the Henri (with limited max. head, less output is expected)

    Closer look here.
    One of the six tanks in the study using 'Corner MattenFilter'. Two other tanks are already using MF, but takes up a whole width of the tank, as constructed earlier.

    Anybody else using this 'Hamburger MattenFilter/Henri deBruyn' combo? I like it. Bill, what about you?
    I'm back & keeping 'em fingers wet,
    Ronnie Lee

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    Haven't tried this combo, yet, Ronnie, but it does look interesting. Nice
    rack system you got there! There's a pond supply place nearby that has
    the foam I want for the Matten but they charge an arm and a leg for it.
    I'll be checking online for hopefully a better deal.

    I would like to hear your feedback on this combo, how often you waterchange, etc.

    Bill

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    An update...

    Air circulation in the study isn't as windy as my open access corridor and the best temp achieved for the latest Henri/Mattenfilter tank is 28C/82F.


    Light load during cycling, low 9w PL lighting and the plants (hornwort and java fern) are doing ok. No water change since setting up and evaporation is negligible.

    Bill, IMHO, worth looking into and hope you find suitable sponge material soon. Water is crystal clear (really!).
    I'm back & keeping 'em fingers wet,
    Ronnie Lee

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonWill
    Bill, IMHO, worth looking into and hope you find suitable sponge material soon. Water is crystal clear (really!).
    Ronnie, I like the whole look of your rack system! Plants look very healthy,
    too. You're not running any CO2 on these tanks(?) If there was a way to
    build the de Bruyn where I didn't use such a large trough (the white
    raingutter) I'd probably build more of them, but gawd, they are an eyesore!
    I've been looking for narrower, smaller boxes for the deBruyn of a more
    topical color, even clear plastic would be good. Having them narrower
    would allow more light into the tank, too: the white raingutter takes up
    nearly a third of the top of a 10 gallon tank So now my quest is
    twofold, the sponge, and the smaller trough

    Your rack system looks like a library of tanks, instead of books

    Bill

  20. #20
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    Bill, none of the 6 tanks are CO fertilized and the whole system is actually 2 sets of 3 tier racks standing side by side. With the exception of the top 2 tanks, 18" height, the rest are 12 inches. I plan to partition all tanks by halves, effectively giving me 12 'cubes'.

    Here's a semi-completed look of the entire rack


    If you're considering clear plastic drip boxes, please wait up for my next Henri/MattenFilter tank.
    I'm back & keeping 'em fingers wet,
    Ronnie Lee

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