Advertisements
Aquatic Avenue Banner Tropica Shop Banner Fishy Business Banner
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: hair or thread algae

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    49
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Country
    Singapore

    hair or thread algae

    Advertisements
    Fresh n Marine aQuarium Banner

    Advertise here

    Advertise here
    Hi,

    Any good suggestions for getting rid of hair or thread algae? I am having them in one of my newly set up tank...

    regards
    jonathan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Ang Mo Kio
    Posts
    4,542
    Feedback Score
    6 (100%)
    Images
    81
    Country
    Singapore
    Get Yamato shrimps by the score.

    After that, try to stablise your tank's fertilisation regime, and all algae should not bother you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    113
    Feedback Score
    0
    Country
    United_States
    What if Yamato Shrimps are not available? Anymore more ideas how to get rid of it?

    Jonathan, is the algae look like a long, green fine-thread that usually clumps in mosses? I have this algae and I usually use a toothbrush to minimize it in my tank .

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    117
    Feedback Score
    0
    Country
    Singapore
    Try SAE or cigar fish. You can try H2O2 for a quick fix but still need to address your tank's imbalance.

    Jack

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    KL
    Posts
    413
    Feedback Score
    0
    Country
    Malaysia
    CO2 and lighting imbalance. Mind to share your CO2 and lighting info?

    Normally increase CO2 and reduce the photoperiod will help to stop. But the existing hair algae. Can be removed manually by hand. (Or using tooth brush, get close to it and twist the tooth brush.) Or else, put in yamato or young Siamese Algae Eater for few days.
    My new blog about field trip, aquascaping, DIY and etc. http://dominicanrepublica.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,229
    Feedback Score
    0
    Images
    38
    Country
    Singapore
    I have the same opinions as Dominic. Get the very young SAE which had not tasted fish food yet. Most (small) shrimps will help too. I do not like Yamato, they are too big and will eat plants (like hair grass and Blyxa) too. Get the CO2 level right at 25~35 ppm, continue to fertilise, keep the water below 28 degree celcius, etc.

    Do the old good measures, do the mechanical/manual remove of the algae first, as much as you can. I would reomve all plants affected, clear them of the algae, throw them away if I can't, then, re-plant.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    41
    Feedback Score
    0
    Country
    Italy
    Hi Jonpoh;
    I take advantage of your question about an argument that I know very well(unlikely) to send my first post on this forum.

    First of all when there is an outbreak of algae in a tank you must also consider whether there is an imbalance or an overdose of nutrients (ammonium-nitrates, phosphates, microelements) or other parameters (mainly the light).

    In my experience hair/thread algae seem to be an exception and once entered in your system they can thrive even if there are no evident imbalances in water chemistry.
    Furthermore, also in the wild, hair algae are typically diffused in clear and clean water.

    Hair algae ( usually belonging to the genus Spirogyra but also Mougeotia, Zygnema Oedogonium, Pithophora ) can be extremely aggressive and invasive but are very easy to get rid of with H2O2 (hydrogen peroxyde).

    You can use a 3% solution adding 0.3 to 1 ml/l to your tank.
    A good beginning is 0.3 ml/l and watch out in the next few days how your algae, fishes and plants behave.

    Be aware that I never tested what I am describing with any type of shrimps.

    The dosage depends on the amount of organic matter present in your tank (the more you have the more H2O2 you have to add) and on the type of your plants and fishes.
    Some very delicate plants can have some damage (usually the ''true'' water plants like vallisneria that are not able to live emersed and then do not produce enough catalase enzyme to break down promptly H2O2 molecule).
    Healty plants anyhow can tolerate H2O2 concentrations up to 1ml/l without dying even if having some damages.

    Hair algae start to die at 0.2ml/l H2O2.

    Even delicate fishes like neon tetras have not damages (if healthy) from these concentrations.

    H2O2 is decomposed in few days into water and oxygen and can be re-dosed if needed.
    Of course no need of water changes.
    In any case is a good idea to try to remove as many dead algae as you can.

    P.S. SAE (crossocheilus siamensis) will not eat any type of hair algae.

    Regards and good luck.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Somewhere on a tiny Island call Sillypore
    Posts
    2,603
    Feedback Score
    0
    Images
    351
    Country
    Singapore
    Hello Jonathan

    I have the same problem, however the thread algae only occurs on my moss and no where else but its bad enough, they sort of hug the moss real tight, so instead of the fluffy moss look, the moss looked like they are being squashed flat onto the driftwood. Really difficult to remove. What i did recently was manually remove them by taking out the driftwood and try to pull them out. And i think the tooth brush method is brillant! Going to try that!

    By the way, are thread and hair algae the same? What i experience on my moss are these very wiry strings that can sometimes come in clumps (thread algae?). I have also experienced before an algae that attached itselfs to the plants and floats with long and seemingly light weight "tail" (hair algae?). So which is which may i ask...
    Eugene (^_^)
    De Dwergcichlide Fanatiek
    Now swimming: Plecos and Apistogrammas

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    49
    Feedback Score
    2 (100%)
    Country
    Singapore

    Hair Algae or thread algae

    Hi..

    First of all, thanks for the overwhelming response to my question! To be honest I am unable to differentiate between thread and hair algae. Which is which I am not sure.. but for sure.. I know that there are two existing types in my tank. I must say that the algae population is starting to be under control after a few water changes. I provide 12 hours of 55w Light. I am not sure about my CO2 concentration, have not tested them yet.

    regards
    Jonathan

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •