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Thread: ADA's Power Sand

  1. #41
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    Hi guys, instead of pumice, what about using lava gravel ? Seems to have a good CEC as well, and sink readily.


    click for larger picture





    I haven't try this for aquarium yet, but I'm just start using it for emerse growing. Have to do some sifting to get the right grain size.
    regards, Budi
    MY PHOTO ALBUM

  2. #42
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    If it is not a floating nuisance, I prefer the pumice over other forms of lava gravel for one simple reason. It has less of other elements, like iron, manganese, etc. The pale gray stuff I just picked up is mostly silicon dioxide, I think, with very few impurities. [Based on the density in the tubs, I am betting that not much of it floats.] It will not change the water chemistry with a lot of dissolving minerals.

    My tap water has adequate iron (over 300 ppb) and other nutrients can be dosed more accurately with the pumice. I see no other reason for not using the lava. Red lava is very popular among many emersed plant growers, I think, like orchid cultivators. It and black lava certainly provide a better substrate color than the stark gray-white of this pumice.

    Wright
    01 760 872-3995
    805 Valley West Circle
    Bishop, CA 93514 USA

  3. #43
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    Wright,
    Would like to see some pics of the 55 when you get it set up.

    Bill

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by bpt
    Hi guys, instead of pumice, what about using lava gravel ?
    Budi, lava rocks or gravel is just as difficult to find in Singapore as pumice. Eheim sells them as some sort of filter medium. I think it costs a lot more than pumice but both are hard to find. Where do you get yours? I suppose its easy for you in Indonesia where volcanoes are many.

    Many years ago, my Mandore told me something about volcano lava. His father was a farmer in Java and he said that if you have lava in your soil, anything you plant grows.

    Loh K L

  5. #45
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    I discovered when I lived in Puerto Rico that a volcanic soil, coupled with tropical warmth (sun) and plenty of water assured that every square inch of bare soil was quickly occupied by a growing plant.

    Wright
    01 760 872-3995
    805 Valley West Circle
    Bishop, CA 93514 USA

  6. #46
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    Most of the fertile lands in Java are actually located at the foothills of the volcanic areas like Mt Merapi. It is commonly believed that since the cooled lava is actually a mixture of minerals and other materials, once it turns into soil, the plants do grow very well in such conditions.

    Another reason is that since lava rock is pretty much porous, the roots can take hold in such crevices, thus holding the plant down firmly.

    I'm not sure if it works with pumice, but according to a LFS owner that I know of, he says that flatworms love tanks that have pumice at the bottom. Since they're a coarser material, the flatworms take refuge in such areas.
    Fish.. Simply Irresistable
    Dawkinsia assimilis, Heros efasciatus - Looking for Pelvicachromis taeniatus
    -back to old school fish-

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by timebomb

    Budi, lava rocks or gravel is just as difficult to find in Singapore as pumice. Eheim sells them as some sort of filter medium. I think it costs a lot more than pumice but both are hard to find. Where do you get yours? I suppose its easy for you in Indonesia where volcanoes are many.

    Many years ago, my Mandore told me something about volcano lava. His father was a farmer in Java and he said that if you have lava in your soil, anything you plant grows.

    Loh K L
    KL, I got the lava gravel from LFS here, about SGD 5 per bag. Locally its called "Pasir Malang", which is named after a city in East Java with volcanoes nearby. As Jianyang pointed out, as well as your mandore, it is true that volcanic soil is very fertile.
    In 1 bag of this gravel, about 1/3 is way too big of grain (> 0.5cm). 1/2 of it is about 2-4 mm size, and the rest is <1mm. Sieving is the nasty part

    This kind of gravel while light and porous, has sharp edges. Thus, some people think it is the drawback, as it might injure fine roots. But, I think, if we don't uproot or move around the plant, it won't effect in such.
    regards, Budi
    MY PHOTO ALBUM

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