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Thread: Freshwater/Tropical Fish diseases

  1. #21
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    Name : Tumors

    Signs of infection :
    Classic signs are a distended body or lumps on the skin.

    Fish Affected :
    All aquarium fish are vulnerable.

    Details of infection :
    Tumours are usually confined to one area of the fish but they grow over time weakening the fish until death occurs.

    Treatment :
    There is no cure for this condition.
    人的一生﹐ 全靠奮斗﹐ 唯有奮斗﹐ 才能成功

  2. #22
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    Name : Velvet


    Picture from mr tree

    Signs of infection :
    Fish rub against hard objects. A yellowish-gray film consisting of tiny spots appears on the fish's body. The fish may also show signs of increased respiration and loss of appetite.

    Fish Affected :
    All aquarium fish are vulnerable particularly fry.

    Details of infection :
    Caused by the parasite Oodinium pillularis. This parasite follows a similar life cycle to White Spot (Ich). The parasite attach themselves to a host fish where they feed and grow. As they mature, the parasite falls from the fish and develops into cysts encased in a membrane on the substrate. Here the cyst divides forming 64 new cells within 4 days where upon the membrane bursts freeing the cells into the aquarium to find a new host. If the cells fail to fin a host within 24 hours, the cell dies.
    Velvet usually only arises when poor aquarium conditions prevail and is highly infectious.

    Treatment :
    Increasing the temperature to 82F and application of a commercial chemical treatment containing copper is most effective. Dimming the aquarium lighting and subjecting the affected fish to a strong (3%) salt bath also aids recovery. It is worth treating for up to one week after all signs of velvet are removed from the aquarium to ensure that mature parasites have been discharged from the fish and developing cysts are eradicated from the substrate.
    人的一生﹐ 全靠奮斗﹐ 唯有奮斗﹐ 才能成功

  3. #23
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    Name : Yellow Grub / Black Spot

    Signs of infection :
    Small black or brown spots up to 2mm diameter on the body and fins.

    Fish Affected :
    Black Spot, Neodiplostomum cuticola, is confined to cold water species such as Goldfish , Carp and Tench. However, a similar condition, Yellow Spot (Clinostomum sp.) can affect tropical aquarium fish.

    Details of infection :
    The spots are the larvae of an intestinal worm. The adult worms live in the intestines of birds that become infected by eating infested fish. Eggs are produced by the adult worms inside the bird's intestines and are passed via droppings to the water where, the eggs then hatch and become free swimming. The free swimming larvae are initially hosted by water snails where upon they are then passed on to fish. When on the fish, the larvae encases itself in a black membrane producing the visible spots. Birds will once again eat infected fish and so the cycle repeats.
    Because of the life cycle of the worm, the condition is not infectious between fish.

    Treatment :
    The simplest form of treatment is to break the life-cycle of the parasite either by ensuring that birds do not approach the fish or that no snails are present in the pond.
    人的一生﹐ 全靠奮斗﹐ 唯有奮斗﹐ 才能成功

  4. #24
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    Name : Lice



    Signs of infection :


    Fish Affected :


    Details of infection :


    Treatment :
    人的一生﹐ 全靠奮斗﹐ 唯有奮斗﹐ 才能成功

  5. #25
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    Name : Stress


    Crumpled/folded fins. Fishes are usually weaken as such, and secondary diseases soon takes over.


    Stunted


    Stunted

    Signs of infection :
    Fish appear lifeless, sunk to bottom, inactive, or folded fins.

    Fish Affected :
    Any.

    Details of infection :
    This usually occurs when fishes are put under stressed such as during transportation, sudden change in water parameter such as pH.

    Treatment :
    Fish should be properly quarantined and acclimatised to the new aquarium to prevent too much stress during introduction to the new environment. Care should be taken when transporting the fish from the shop to the aquarium.
    人的一生﹐ 全靠奮斗﹐ 唯有奮斗﹐ 才能成功

  6. #26
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    Hi,
    Great advice and information! I have a 10 year old Angel fish and she just develoved cotton mouth. She was healthy until I added two new female baby Angels a month ago and then removed the Black Tetras, except one whom I can't catch! The older Angel seems to enjoy the new Angels. All was fine until yesterday and I suspect the Tetra. Do you think I'm right?

  7. #27
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    After some read up on the internet and studying the active ingredients of varies product for treating parasite in LFS for my goldfish parasite problem, I end up with this product which prove worthly a mention. Jungle Gold Care - Parasite Care. Around $8.50 per bottle in solid form.

    CAUTION: THIS IS A SHRIMP AND SNAIL KILLER AS WELL !

    Active ingredients : Sodium Chloride (Salt?), Trichlorfon, Diflubenzuron (Dimilin)

    More findings in varies website and write ups are as follows:

    The fish louse is a very dangerous parasite. Its hooks can go into the fishes skin and gills and causes extreme irritation. Due to the open wound the fish is suspectible to secondary infections like bacterial gill disease and ulcers. Besides the physical injuries to the fish, the constant irritation causes stress, which might lead to secondary parasite attacks like Ich and Costia.

    Best treated with medication containing Diflubenzuron or Dimillin (3 times with 6 days apart). The visible fish lice should be taken off of the fishes body with tweezers, the red spot that the hooks leave behind, needs to be treated with neosporin or Panalog.

    Diflubenzuron(Dimilin) (1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea), also known as dimilin, is a potent broad-spectrum insect growth regulator that interferes with chitin synthesis at time of molting and is effective in controlling immature stages of insects. Diflubenzuron was approved for domestic use in 1976 to control gypsy moth (Lyrnantria dispar), and in 1979 against the cotton boll weevil (Anthonamus grandis). By 1989 this compound was also registered for domestic use against mosquitos, forest Lepidoptera, mushroom flies, and leaf-eating insect pests of citrus, woody ornamentals, vegetables, and fruit. Diflubenzuron seldom persists for more than a few days in soil and water. When used properly in forest management, it is unlikely to be leached into ground water from the application site.

    Diflubenzuron(Dimilin) is used mainly to control insects on crops and is not licensed for fish use. The concern is it's indiscriminant action against aquatic insect life. Such concerns are justified when used in natural environments such as lakes and rivers - but clearly less of a concern in garden ponds.

    This is an effective treatment against copepod crustacean parasites such as Lernaea (Anchor Worm), Ergasilus (gill maggots), and is less toxic towards fish than organophosphates.

    Insects have an exoskeleton - which basically means they have their skeleton on the outside, rather than the inside as we do. Diflubenzuron(Dimilin) works by interfering with the development of the new chitin exoskeleton, so the insect larvae continues to feed and develop normally until they shed their old exoskeleton. They die because the new exoskeleton is not properly formed.

    Exposure of the general population to diflubenzuron via water or food, as a result of its use in agriculture, against forest insects, or in mosquito control, is negligible.

    Trichlorfon is useful for the control of multicellular invertebrate parasites attached to or embedded in marine and freshwater fishes (including pond fishes such as goldfish and koi). Trichlorfon contains an inert carrier chemical for safer and easier dispensing. Trichlorfon will treat diseases caused by multicellular parasites, such as Gyrodactylus , Dactylogyrus , Neobenedenia (flukes), Argulus (fish lice), Lernaea (anchorworm) and leeches. Secondary invading bacterial and fungal infections in the wounds caused by these parasites are common in the host.

    Trichlorfon is more stable and effective in acidic water (pH below 7.0). As the pH rises above 7.0, the instability increases. Trichlorfon is unstable in alkaline conditions, and destabilizes quickly in marine environments. Trichlorfon is toxic to invertebrates, especially crustaceans (shrimp, crabs, lobsters) and mollusks (snails and nudibranchs). Remove all invertebrates from the aquarium or pond prior to treatment. Trichlorfon should be used with caution when treating freshwater angelfish and discus, which tend to be sensitive to treatment when the temperatures are high and the water is acidic.

    Trichlorfon can be added directly to aquariums or ponds utilizing biological filtration, and it will not interfere in the nitrification process. Treat fish once per week.

    Trichlorfon organophosphates work by interfering with the nervous system of the parasite and thus affect vital physiological processes. OPs are potentially dangerous to both fish and humans and, for a variety of reasons, their use in fish disease control has been banned in many countries.

    Sodium chloride(Salt) when properly administered, is safe for use in freshwater fish. It can be used to treat many external parasites including Costia, Epistylis, Trichodina, Chilodonella and flukes Dactilogyrus and Gyrodactylus. Salt may be used in the treatment of sliminess of the skin in the early stages of Pillularis and velvet diseases and against ectoparasites such as skin flukes (Gyrodactylus), anchor worms, and fish lice. It can also provide additional treatment in several cases of bacterial diseases.

    Anyway, I believe you guys should by now know how useful salt is in our golfish keeping and I will not go on any further.
    Last edited by D!Concept; 22nd Sep 2007 at 01:56.

  8. #28
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    Re: Freshwater/Tropical Fish diseases

    Please help me! My Discus has been happy and healthy for the past 3 years... suddenly he's turned dark and has this patch of "dead" looking scales on his side.../Users/planetpatti/Desktop/IMG_0755.jpg
    /Users/planetpatti/Desktop/IMG_0752.JPG

    I tried water changes and cleaning the tank. He looks miserable and I'm very worried. His usually bright turquoise coloration becomes even more vibrant when you watch him, as if he has an inner light that comes on when observed. There are two angelfish, a plecostomus and a clown loach in the tank with him... they've all been together for 3 years.

    Please help!

  9. #29
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    Re: Freshwater/Tropical Fish diseases

    Hi,

    After 3 years of problem-free fishkeeping I have suddenly suffered multiple fish deaths, but all to tetras only (Cardinal, Gold, Glowlight & Rummy nose) - my Corydoras, Discus & Otto are fine.
    All water parameters are ideal as I use RO water changing 20% of the 260L weekly.

    Given that this started after I introduced the RummyNose tetras I suspect a Family-specific bacterial disease.

    Symptoms are absent - full colour, feeding with no external signs of illness & then the next day, death. Each day for the last week I've lost 1-2 fish per day.

    Any advice?

    Thanks,
    Rob

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